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  • UH Press wins $90K grant for open-access publishing

    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Hawaiʻi a $90,000 grant to digitize 100 out-of-print University of Hawaiʻi Press books for open access. The project is part of the Humanities Open Book Program, a joint initiative between the Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). “We’re grateful to the…

  • UH Press publishes open-access Hawaiian language journal

    The University of Hawaiʻi Press now publishes the new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature. The entirety of Palapala volume 1, issue 1, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is freely available at the UH Press website. “We are honored to offer, through a collaboration with the UHlibrary and the support of the university,…

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Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)

Figure 4 from the article “Taiwan’s Dacini Fruit Flies: Rare Endemics and Abundant Pests, along Altitudinal Gradients” by Camiel Doorenwerd, Luc Leblanc, Yu-Feng Hsu, Chia-Lung Huang, Yu-Chi Lin, Michael San Jose, and Daniel Rubinoff. Bactrocera dorsaloides, voucher number ms4389, first recorded for Taiwan. (A) dorsal view, (B) head, frontal view, (C) abdomen detail photo, dorsal view, (D) lateral view, (E) detail photo of the wing.

The first issue in volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Talāsiga Lands in Fiji: Their Potential Expansion through Modern Farming Activities” by R.J. Morrison, and eight more research articles.

Preview volume 73 number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)”

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)

The December issue of Oceanic Linguistics marks the end of an era. Retiring editor John Lynch, managing editor Byron Bender, and review editor Robert Blust will join the editorial advisory board as a new, international team takes over the helm.

In the final pages of this issue, Lynch writes, “On behalf of the outgoing team, I would like to thank authors for the constant flow of submissions, and for their generous acceptance of decisions that are not always in their favor; and I would like to wish the incoming team all the best for the future of Oceanic Linguistics.” Learn more about the new Oceanic Linguistics team here.

In this issue, Robert Blust remembers Richard Bernard McGinn Jr. (1939-2018), a “scholar who had a lifetime commitment to the Austronesian languages of insular Southeast Asia, a talented fieldworker, a lively and enthusiastic teacher, a skilled administrator and facilitator, a friend and colleague with an irrepressible sense of humor, and a committed social activist in his retirement years.” Continue reading “Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)

 Na Hyesŏk's Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.
Figure 1 from “Anarchism and Culture in Colonial Korea” by Sunyoung Park this issue. Na Hyesŏk’s Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes a special section, “Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia,” guest edited by Steven S. Lee. In his introduction, Lee writes that these articles build on existing scholarship by

“…revisiting Russian and Soviet visions of revolution and their fraught, indelible imprint on China, Japan, and Korea. The Soviet Union of the interwar years was distinct from European powers in its mobilization against Western empire and capitalism. Indeed, Russia itself had long been regarded in the West as semi-Asiatic, whereas its stunning defeat in the Russo-Japanese War had blurred long-standing racial and cultural hierarchies. Soviet-Asian encounters might therefore best be understood as intra-Asian—Russia as an ‘Oriental occident’ that, after 1917, beckoned progressive Asians with calls for socialist internationalism and national self-determination. These encounters contributed to the establishment of communist regimes in China and North Korea but also reveal internationalist paths not taken: ways of thinking across national boundaries even while pursuing national struggles against empire. Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)”

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)

Volume 23 Number 4 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and 22 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEWS

Principles and Practices of Chinese Governance a Millennium Ago (reviewing Patricia Buckley and Paul J. Smith, eds. State Power in China, 900-1325) Reviewed by R. Bin Wong

Mao’s, China’s, or Confucius’s Tianxia? Reflections on Chinese Visions of World Order (reviewing Ban Wang, editor. Chinese Visions of World Order—Tianxia, Culture, and World Politics) Reviewed by Bai Tongdong Continue reading “China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)”

Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)

Figure 2 from Kenneth Chan’s essay “Bad Gal” And The “Bad” Refugee: Refugee Narratives, Neoliberal Violence, and Musical Autobiography in Honey Cocaine’s Cambodian Canadian Hip-Hop: The “Orientalist” scene in Honey Cocaine’s “Bad Gal.” Reprinted by permission of Honey Cocaine Music.

From Biography Coeditor John David Zuern’s Editor’s Note:

The format of this issue represents something of a departure for Biography. For many years we have published what we call “clusters” of essays focused on a particular theme alongside our individual open-forum articles. While our editorial staff typically determines the topics and invites the guest editors for our annual special issues, the cluster model gives us the opportunity to consider unsolicited proposals from colleagues who would like to present an edited collection of related essays to Biography’s readership. In the past two years, we have received a number of compelling pitches, and for the first time we are running two clusters in the same issue. These projects have emerged within different geopolitical and cultural contexts, but both address the question of how life stories are crafted and disseminated in media other than print. Continue reading “Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)”

AWP 2019: Join Manoa and The Contemporary Pacific for Translation Panel

The Contemporary Pacific and Manoa at AWP 2019Two journals celebrate their 30th anniversary this yearMĀNOA and The Contemporary Pacific—and join together for two great events at the 2019 Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) Conference in Portland, OR.

The conference brings together more than 12,000 attendees over four days. Mark March 29, 2019 on your calendars to catch these panel discussions.  Continue reading “AWP 2019: Join Manoa and The Contemporary Pacific for Translation Panel”

Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its third special publication. “Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austro-Asiatic Linguistics” is a collection of nine papers.

The conference, held every two years, took place in Kiel, Germany in Fall 2017. This is the fourth published conference proceedings since the conference’s inception at the University of Hawai‘i in 1973. The first was an Oceanic Linguistics special issue in 1976, followed by publications in 2011 and 2014.

“With this special issue we return full circle to publication under the University of Hawai’i Press, and are extremely excited to be part of a new wave of Austroasiatic [AA] studies,” writes editors Hiram Ring and Felix Rau. “There is much work yet to be done on these languages with all their diversity and complexity, but given the multiple perspectives and insights represented by the authors in this volume, and the increasing focus by AA researchers on making underlying data accessible, the outlook for AA studies in the coming century is incredibly positive.” Continue reading “Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS”

Support MĀNOA’s Upcoming Title, Becoming Brazil

The team at MĀNOA has just launched two ways to support the longstanding journal of international writing. Supporters can back the upcoming issue, Becoming Brazil, through Kickstarter and also pledge support for the journal overall through Patreon.

Support Becoming Brazil on Kickstarter

Becoming Brazil Manoa 30-2 Front CoverBecoming Brazil: New Fiction, Poetry, and Memoir is the forthcoming title from MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing. The issue includes more than two dozen works by canonical twentieth-century Brazilian writers, innovative contemporary authors, and new voices, many of them in translation for the first time.

Authors include Conceição Evaristo, Marcílio França Castro, Milton Hatoum, José Luiz Passos, and João Guimarães Rosa. Becoming Brazil also features images by celebrated photographers Sebastião Salgado and Marcio Rodrigues. Guest-edited by Eric M. B. Becker (founder of Words without Borders) and MĀNOA contributing editor Noah Perales-Estoesta, Becoming Brazil will appear in a handsome print edition from the University of Hawai‘i Press, a digital edition through Project MUSE; and an ebook through Amazon.com.

Learn how to support Becoming Brazil on Kickstarter.

Support MĀNOA through Patreon Continue reading “Support MĀNOA’s Upcoming Title, Becoming Brazil”

Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 9#2, 2018

This issue of the Journal of Korean Religions is on Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts with guest editor, Philip J. Ivanhoe. From the editor’s introduction:

Clifford Geertz writes, ”We are, in sum, incomplete or unfinished animals who complete ourselves through culture—and not through culture in general but through highly particular forms of it.”1 At least part of his point is that unlike other animals, many of whom—like bees, ducks, or dolphins—live in complex and orderly societies, human beings are creatures that come into the world with only a partially written script, unsure of exactly what characters they are to play, what roles they should fulfill, and how they and their actions contribute to some larger scheme or plan. Like culture, religion attempts to fill in the script by providing accounts of human nature, the proper roles humans should play, and how human actions contribute to some grand vision or cosmic plan. Nevertheless, as Geertz makes clear, we can only understand how religion does what it does by looking carefully at particular religions. This special issue of the Journal of Korean Religions seeks to do just that by being dedicated to ”Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts.” The five essays it contains explore a set of interrelated issues about how Confucians, among them Koreans, fill in the script of human life aiming to orient and guide human beings to satisfying and meaningful lives. These essays describe key components of a distinctively Confucian form of spirituality by analyzing characteristically Confucian concerns with cultivating the self in ways that complete human nature, enable one to fulfill one’s proper roles within family and society, take one’s correct place in the world, and realize the Heavenly ordained purpose of one’s life.

Continue reading “Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 9#2, 2018”

U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, Vol. 53, 2018

This issue includes the following scholarly articles.

Facing Modernity: Japanese Women and Hygienic Facial Culture (Biganjutsu) in the Early Twentieth Century
JENNIFER EVANS

“Uncovering the Waste of the World”: Women and the State in Japanese Wartime Waste Campaigns, 1937-1945
REBECCA TOMPKINS

The Contradictions of the Womenomics Campaign: Abe Shinzō’s Employment Reforms and Japan’s Public Service Workers
CHARLES WEATHERS

X-Rated and Excessively Long: Ji-Amari in Hayashi Amari’s Tanka
JON HOLT

Stories by Fujino Kaori: Fear in the Form
KENDALL HEITZMAN

“Today’s Modern Spirits”
FUJINO KAORI

“Identity,”
FUJINO KAORI Continue reading “U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, Vol. 53, 2018”

Language Documentation & Conservation: Special Issue and New Articles (Volume 12)

New uploads have been added to the National Foreign Language Resource Center’s free and open-access journal Language Documentation & Conservation.

A Descriptive Grammar of Shilluk By Bert Remijsen & Otto Gwado Ayoker Continue reading “Language Documentation & Conservation: Special Issue and New Articles (Volume 12)”

Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 52 (2018)

Figure 1 (from the article “Kalākaua and the British Press: The King’s Visit to Europe, 1881”): Kalākaua in uniform wearing the collar, star, badge, and sash of the Order of St. Michael and St. George awarded to him by Queen Victoria during the king’s world tour in 1881. No Date. Courtesy of Bishop Museum.

From page 40 of the article:

The [Whitehall Review] reporter concluded from his interview with the king that Hawaiʻi under Kalākaua was an extremely highly developed country. Indeed, the writer observed, “I parted from his Majesty with regret, envying his subjects” and “hoping that the king would move to England.” Continue reading “Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 52 (2018)”