Press Releases

  • UH Press wins $90K grant for open-access publishing

    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Hawaiʻi a $90,000 grant to digitize 100 out-of-print University of Hawaiʻi Press books for open access. The project is part of the Humanities Open Book Program, a joint initiative between the Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). “We’re grateful to the…

  • UH Press publishes open-access Hawaiian language journal

    The University of Hawaiʻi Press now publishes the new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature. The entirety of Palapala volume 1, issue 1, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is freely available at the UH Press website. “We are honored to offer, through a collaboration with the UHlibrary and the support of the university,…

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Early Release Articles: Rapa Nui Journal (October 2018)

Earlier this year, UH Press renewed the publication of the Rapa Nui Journal in a new partnership with the Easter Island Foundation. Two early release articles for Vol. 31, No. 1, are now available on the Project MUSE platform.

RAPA NUI JOURNFig. 2. Soft, siliceous woody plant
Figure 2 from “Revisiting Rapa Nui Mata‘a” an early release article now available on Project MUSE.

“Comparisons of Moriori, Maori, and Easter Island Cognates” by Rhys Richards

All the surviving 1,200 words from the extinct Moriori language were compared with Maori and Easter Island languages. A Moriori speaker would have understood much said by an Easter Islander as their languages shared at least one word in five, or over 20%, and probably shared many more.

“Revisiting Rapa Nui Mata‘a” by Robin Torrence, Nina Kononenko, Peter White

Based on a use-wear and residue analysis of a collection of 12 mata‘a in the Australian Museum, Sydney, we question the value of relying on tool shape as an adequate indication of past use. Although the tools in this collection were used for a broad range of tasks, including plant processing, wood, shell and bone working, and cutting and piercing of flesh or skin, some may have been used in interpersonal conflict. The study illustrates the value of museum ethnographic collections for understanding past tool use. Continue reading “Early Release Articles: Rapa Nui Journal (October 2018)”

Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its second special publication. “Papers from the Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium on Southeast Asian Linguistics” is a collection of 19 papers.

The symposium organizers and volume editors invited authors to submit their manuscripts, which were then assessed by two anonymous reviewers to ensure high quality. Editors Pittayawat Pittayaporn, Sujinat Jitwiriyanont, Pavadee Saisuwan, and Bhimbasistha Tejarajanya say that all these student papers are “outstanding and reflects the authors’ high potential to become great linguists. Importantly, the number of promising young scholars that contributed to this volume suggests a very bright future for Southeast Asian linguistics as a field.” Continue reading “Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)”

Call for Papers: Global Automobilization, Journal of World History

This Special Issue of the Journal of World History invites article manuscripts that address any aspect related to the global, transnational, and cross-cultural histories of automobilization, automobilism, anti-automobilism, de-pedestrianization, and re-pedestrianization. Continue reading “Call for Papers: Global Automobilization, Journal of World History”

Words from the Fire: Poems by Jidi Majia (MĀNOA 30:1)

Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo. Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo.
This Nuosu ritual painting is of the magical python Bbahxa Ayuosse or Bbahxa Arrysse, one of the supernatural helpers of the Nuosu hero Zhyge Alu. Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo. Object #1998–83/102—Scroll, Painting. Gift of the Blakemore Foundation, courtesy of Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington.

The new issue of MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, volume 30 number 1, is a collection of poems by Jidi Majia, translated by Jami Proctor Xu.

Jidi Majia is a member of the Yi ethnic minority group, one of the fifty-five officially recognized minorities in China and the sixth largest, comprising about nine million people. The subgroup to which Jidi Majia belongs, Nuosu, is the largest. For centuries Nuosu people have held on to their language, culture, and social structure, staving off assimilation by the majority Han.

This collection of more than 125 of Jidi Majia’s poems opens with an editor’s note and concludes with a translation of Jidi Majia’s speech for the 2017 Xu Zhimo Poetry and Art Festival at Cambridge University. More than a dozen images featuring Nuosu scrolls and paintings accompany the poems. Continue reading “Words from the Fire: Poems by Jidi Majia (MĀNOA 30:1)”

Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (October 2018)

University of Hawaiʻi Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles and book reviews from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

Review of Ross King’s Seoul: Memory, Reinvention, and the Korean Wave. University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2018.
by Keith Howard

Review of The Korean Wave: Evolution, Fandom, and Transnationality, edited by Tae-Jin Yoon and Dal Long Jin. Lexington Books, 2017.
by Roald Maliangkay

Review of Dafna Zur’s Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea. Stanford University Press, 2017
by Sonya F. Zabala

Review of Kōji Takazawa’s Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles. University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2017.
by John Cussen

The Punishments of the 1728 Musin Rebellion Leaders (article)
by Andrew David Jackson

Muhammad Kkansu and the Diasporic Other in the Two Koreas (article)
by Theodore Jun Yoo

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.

Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)

From the article “New Distribution Records of Cetaceans from the Federated States of Micronesia,” by Donald W. Buden and Allain Bourgoin. Cetaceans recorded on Pohnpei for the first time: Kogia sp., A, whole body, ventral view; B, undersurface of head showing teeth and jaws. Globicephala macrorhynchusC, whole body; D, oblique view of head showing teeth and jaws.

The fourth issue in volume 72 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Nocturnal Visual Census of Pelagic Fauna Using Scuba near Kona, Hawaiʻi”, eight more research articles, plus an index to all of volume 72. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)”

Asian Perspectives, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)

From Asian Perspectives 57-2: The first Peking Man tooth, PMU M3550 (left) and original label (right), assigning the tooth to a new genus and species: Sinanthropus pekinensis Black.
From this issue, “The Dates of the Discovery of the First Peking Man Fossil Teeth” by Qian Wang, Li Sun, and Jan Ove R. Ebbestad. The first Peking Man tooth, PMU M3550 (left) and original label (right), assigning the tooth to a new genus and species: Sinanthropus pekinensis Black.

This issue of Asian Perspectives features the following scholarly articles:

Late Middle Palaeolithic Subsistence in the Central Plain of China: A Zooarchaeological View from the Laonainaimiao Site, Henan Province
Qu Tongli, Chen Youcheng, Ofer Bar-Yosef, and Wang Youping

New Data from an Open Neolithic Site in Eastern Indonesia
Peter Lape, Emily Peterson, Daud Tanudirjo, Chung-Ching Shiung, Gyoung-Ah Lee, Judith Field, and Adelle Coster

Preliminary Results of the South Vanuatu Archaeological Survey: Cultural Landscapes, Excavation, and Radiocarbon Dating
James L. Flexner, Stuart Bedford, Frédérique Valentin, Richard Shing, Takaronga Kuautonga, and Wanda Zinger

The Dates of the Discovery of the First Peking Man Fossil Teeth
Qian Wang, Li Sun, and Jan Ove R. Ebbestad

The Guandimiao Bone Assemblage (and What it Says about the Shang Economy)
Hou Yanfeng, Roderick Campbell, Li Zhipeng, Zhang Yan, Li Suting, and He Yuling

Continue reading “Asian Perspectives, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)”

China Review International vol. 23 no. 3 (2016)

Volume 23 Number 3 of China Review International begins with three featured reviews and 27 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

Steven Sangren, Filiality, and the Holy Grail of Chinese Anthropology (reviewing P. Steven Sangren, Filial Obsessions: Chinese Patriliny and Its Discontents) Reviewed by Christopher Lupke

Confucianism With German Characteristics (reviewing Ming-huei Lee, Confucianism: Its Roots and Global Signicance) Reviewed by Stephen C. Angle

The Chinese Maritime Customs Service: A Chinese, Western, or Global Agency? (reviewing Felix Boecking, No Great Wall: Trade, Taris, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945) Reviewed by Chihyun Chang

Continue reading “China Review International vol. 23 no. 3 (2016)”

Asian Theatre Journal, vol. 35, no. 2 (2018)

The Ex-Rebel Lads, photo by Wang Mei-xin
In this issue, “A Queer Fantasy World of The New Member: The Phenomenon of the First Boys’ Love musical in Taiwan” by Wen-ling Lin. Photo by Wang Mei-xin, courtesy of The Ex-Rebel Lads.

The Fall 2018 issue of the Asian Theatre Journal opens with a note from new editor Siyuan Liu:

This is the thirty-fifth year of ATJ’s publication. As Confucius said, “at thirty I stood firm; at forty I had no more doubts.” That seems to describe ATJ aptly: we’re now firmly established as the journal on Asian theatre but we are still growing, not yet at the stage having no more doubts or questions. In a way, this issue serves as a reminder of our wide scope, both in terms of the contributors’ geographic locations, with half of them based in Asia, and their topics, from traditional theatre to spoken drama, from translation of a wartime Japanese student play to discussion of the world’s largest collection of Indonesian puppets, from dance as gendered nationalism in Tajikistan to the institutionalization of Chinese ethnic dance in Singapore. Continue reading “Asian Theatre Journal, vol. 35, no. 2 (2018)”

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 9, no. 1 (April 2018)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 9, no. 1, a special issue on Religions in Cold War Korea and Peacemaking, guest edited by Heonik Kwon and Seong Nae Kim (view their Introduction here), features the following articles:

Continue reading “Journal of Korean Religions vol. 9, no. 1 (April 2018)”

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers, vol. 80 (2018)

The 2018 Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers presents a wide range of geographic studies:

The Village Homes Subdivision in Davis: Origins and Evolution of “A Better Place to Live”
By Dennis J. Dingemans

Three Stories about a Statue
By Ronald Davidson

Rock Coating and Weathering-Rind Development at the Edge of Retreating Glaciers: An Initial Study
Ronald I. Dorn and Ara Jeong

Tecolutla: Mexico’s Gulf Coast Acapulco?
Klaus J. Meyer-Arendt

Environmental Knowledge, American Indians, and John Muir’s Trap
Michael W. Pesses

Supplemental Instruction as a Resource for Graduate Student Pedagogical Development
Kalli F. Doubleday and Stacie A. Townsend

Plus meeting reports, awards, and abstracts. Continue reading “Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers, vol. 80 (2018)”

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 30 no. 2 (2018): Repossessing Paradise

“Repossessing Paradise,” the new special issue from The Contemporary Pacific, opens with an introduction from guest editors Kalissa Alexeyeff and Siobhan McDonnell, “Whose Paradise? Encounter, Exchange, and Exploitation.” They write:

This collection arose from thinking about how Pacific Islanders utilize the trope of paradise to describe their lives and the places they call home. Like the many studies that precede this, our work demonstrates how paradise has come to define the Pacific through certain kinds of generic, infinitely reoccurring, and highly substitutable images: beautiful beaches, verdant foliage, and exotic peoples and customs. We show how these images enable possession (from early exploration, through colonial settlement, and including contemporary tourism) and how this is twinned with the dispossession of land, Indigenous peoples, and their epistemologies. What distinguishes this collection from most previous literature is that we combine analyses of contemporary possession with repossession in our exploration of the ways in which Indigenous people reimagine or repurpose paradise for their own needs and desires. Continue reading “The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 30 no. 2 (2018): Repossessing Paradise”