Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies

Top downloads of new 2018 content in our Asian Studies journals include articles and reviews from quarterly China Review International and annual Korean Studies, which also publishes early release articles throughout the year. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies”

Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)

 Na Hyesŏk's Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.
Figure 1 from “Anarchism and Culture in Colonial Korea” by Sunyoung Park this issue. Na Hyesŏk’s Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes a special section, “Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia,” guest edited by Steven S. Lee. In his introduction, Lee writes that these articles build on existing scholarship by

“…revisiting Russian and Soviet visions of revolution and their fraught, indelible imprint on China, Japan, and Korea. The Soviet Union of the interwar years was distinct from European powers in its mobilization against Western empire and capitalism. Indeed, Russia itself had long been regarded in the West as semi-Asiatic, whereas its stunning defeat in the Russo-Japanese War had blurred long-standing racial and cultural hierarchies. Soviet-Asian encounters might therefore best be understood as intra-Asian—Russia as an ‘Oriental occident’ that, after 1917, beckoned progressive Asians with calls for socialist internationalism and national self-determination. These encounters contributed to the establishment of communist regimes in China and North Korea but also reveal internationalist paths not taken: ways of thinking across national boundaries even while pursuing national struggles against empire. Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 1 (May 2018)

This Spring issue of Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review features a reexamination of China’s rich maritime history. Guest editors Eugenio Menegon, Philip Thai, and Xing Hang begin the special issue introduction describing how the seaways of Asia have fostered cultural exchange and economic integration. They write:

The liminal maritime zone surrounding China remains a paradox between seas and ports teeming with legal and illegal exchange and governmental policies attempting to monopolize and restrict that exchange. Vast and fluid, maritime China has long hindered state control and fostered connections determined as much by bottom-up economic and cultural logic as by top-down official impositions. Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 1 (May 2018)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 2 (November 2017)

Mandala scroll
Mandala of the Two Worlds (Ryōkai mandara), one of two hanging scrolls, Edo period (1693). Ink and colors on silk, 410.9 x 378.4 cm (each). Tōji Temple, Kyoto. Source: Sawa and Hamada (1983–1984, 24, 29). From “Sankei Mandara: Layered Maps to Sacred Places,” in this issue.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review vol. 6, no. 2 opens with a section on cartography, echoing a theme published in vol. 6, no. 1 earlier this year. 

Maps and Their Contexts: Reflections on Cartography and Culture in Premodern East Asia

Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 2 (November 2017)”

#LookItUP: Free Speech and the Media in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 3 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Free Speech and the Media

Red Peonies: Two Novellas of China

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, Volume 28, Number 2, 2016
Special Volume: Red Peonies: Two Novellas of China, guest edited by Karen Gernant and Chen Zeping

Context: Published twice a year, MĀNOA features contemporary literature from Asia and the Pacific, often in translation. Volume 28 includes the work of author Zhang Yihe, whose novellas were banned in China and appear here in English for the first time. Charged as a counter-revolutionary in China, Yihe based her stories on the people she met while sentenced to 21 years in a remote labor prison. In 2017, MĀNOA was awarded $10,000 grant to pursue new projects in Burma and Cambodia from the National Endowment of the Arts, which is currently under threat of discontinued federal funding.

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Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review,Volume 6, Number 1, May 2017
Article: War Remembered, Revolution Forgotten: Recasting the Sino-North Korean Alliance in China’s Post-Socialist Media State” by Zhao Ma

Context: Scholar Zhao Ma explores the process of a nation’s remembering and forgetting the bloodshed and fervor behind a war—in this case, China’s involvement with North Korea—when it is recast through state-run media and propaganda.

 

Language Documentation & Conservation, Volume 11, 2017LDCposter2012LOW
Article: LD&C possibilities for the next decade” by Nick Thieberger

Context: As LD&C celebrates its 10th anniversary, editor Nick Thieberger takes a look at the journal’s downloads, Facebook following, and other statistics that have brought the open-access journal’s research to linguistics scholars across the globe, and wonders how new technology will change the field in the coming decade.

 

Oceanic LinguisticsVolume 56, Number 1, June 2017
Article:
Influence of Social Network on Language Use of Kejaman Speakers in Sarawak, Malaysia” by Amee Joan and Su-Hie TingOL56-1_cover1_blog

Context: This study on linguistics changes in Malaysia carries more weight than if it had been published in previous years. From the article’s introduction: “In our view, social network can be studied as a proxy of interlinked determinants of language maintenance or shift. Investigating the influence of social network on language choice would contribute to a holistic understanding of factors determining language shift.”

 

 

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

Call for Papers: Cross-Currents

The editorial board of Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review—a joint project of the Research Institute of Korean Studies (RIKS) at Korea University and the Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS) at the University of California, Berkeley—is currently accepting submissions of research articles, as well as proposals for special issues and photo essays.

Cross-Currents is a peer-reviewed, open-access, quarterly online and semi-annual print journal that offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities.

The journal seeks to balance issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. This English-language journal includes scholarship on material from the 16th century to the present day that has significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture.

Embedded in a web-based platform with functions for collaboration, discussion, and an innovative publishing process, the e-journal uses new technologies to facilitate a dialogue among East Asia scholars around the world that is enhanced by audio-visual and multilingual capabilities. The semi-annual print issues of Cross-Currents (available through University of Hawai‘i Press and Project MUSE) feature research articles from the e-journal (the journal of record for indexing and citation purposes).

Complete information on how to prepare and submit articles and proposals may be found online here.

Cross-Currents is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, the Bibliography of Asian Studies, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), and Project MUSE. The e-journal operates under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License. 

Please email inquiries to the Managing Editor at crosscurrents@berkeley.edu.


About the Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives on material from the sixteenth century to the present day that have significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture. Its semiannual print issues feature peer-reviewed content from the online version of the journal.

 Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions are available through UH Press.

Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 1 (2017)

From Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map Uranchimeg Tsultemin. Bhavacakra, the Buddhist Wheel of Life. Thangka painting, Central Tibet, late nineteenth century. Source: Theos Bernard-Eleanor Murray collection, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

 

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 6, number 1 is now available and features the following articles.

Cartographic Anxieties

  • Introduction to “Cartographic Anxieties” by Franck Bille
  • Fishers and Territorial Anxieties in China and Vietnam: Narratives of the South China Sea Beyond the Frame of the Nation by Edyta Roszko
  • The Da Ming Hunyi: Repurposing a Ming Map in Sino-African Diplomancy by Alexander Akin
  • Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map by Uranchimeg Tsultemin
  • On China’s Cartographic Embrace: A View from Its Northern Rim by Franck Bille
  • A Spectacle of Maps: Cartographic Hopes and Anxieties in the Pamirs by Martin Saxer

Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 1 (2017)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 1 (May 2017)

From Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map Uranchimeg Tsultemin. Bhavacakra, the Buddhist Wheel of Life. Thangka painting, Central Tibet, late nineteenth century. Source: Theos Bernard-Eleanor Murray collection, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

 

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 6, number 1 is now available and features the following articles.

Cartographic Anxieties

  • Introduction to “Cartographic Anxieties” by Franck Bille
  • Fishers and Territorial Anxieties in China and Vietnam: Narratives of the South China Sea Beyond the Frame of the Nation by Edyta Roszko
  • The Da Ming Hunyi: Repurposing a Ming Map in Sino-African Diplomancy by Alexander Akin
  • Cartographic Anxieties in Mongolia: The Bogd Khan’s Picture-Map by Uranchimeg Tsultemin
  • On China’s Cartographic Embrace: A View from Its Northern Rim by Franck Bille
  • A Spectacle of Maps: Cartographic Hopes and Anxieties in the Pamirs by Martin Saxer

Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 6, no. 1 (May 2017)”

Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 2 (2016)

From “Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the ‘Shanghai of Tibet'” in this issue. Photograph of Chu-nyi Barpa achak khapa (Ch. Qiujia guozhuang) taken by Sun Mingjing, 1944.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 2 is now available and features the following articles.

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

  • Introduction to “Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham” by Stephane Gros
  • “To Control Tibet, First Pacify Kham”: Trade Routes and “Official Routes” (Guandao) in Easternmost Kham by Partrick Booz
  • Construction Work and Wages at the Dergé Printing House in the Eighteenth Century by Remi Chaix
  • Guozhuang Trading Houses and Tibetan Middlemen in Dartsedo, the “Shanghai of Tibet” by Yudru Tsomu
  • Victorianizing Guangxu: Arresting Flows, Minting Coins, and
    Exerting Authority in Early Twentieth-Century Kham by Scott Relyea
  • Tricks of the Trade: Debt and Imposed Sovereignty in Southernmost Kham in the Nineteenth to Twentieth Centuries by Stephane Gros
  • Memory Politics at Work in a Gyalrong Revolt in the Early Twentieth Century by Jinba Tenzin
  • Afterword: Why Kham? Why Borderlands? Coordinating New
    Research Programs for Asia by C. Patterson Giersch

Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 2 (2016)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 1 (2016)

01_CC 5-1 Greene_Page_15_Image_0001
Tiles from the proposed version of reformed mahjong mentioned in “The Game People Played” by Maggie Greene in this issue. From the right, tiles include government types, classes of citizens, countries, continents, oceans, and technology.

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review volume 5, number 1 is now available and features the following articles:

  • The Game People Played: Mahjong in Modern Chinese Society and Culture by Maggie Greene
  • The Afterlives of An Chunggŭn in Republican China: From Sinocentric Appropriation to a Rupture in Nationalism by Inhye Han
  • Against the Nihilism of Suffering and Death: Richard E.K. Kim and His Works by Jooyeon Rhee
  • Street Theater and Subject Formation in Wartime China: Toward a New Form of Public Art by Xiaobing Tang
  • Domesticating Hybridity: Straits Chinese Cultural Heritage Projects in Malaysia and Singapore by Karen M. Teoh
  • A Russian Radical and East Asia in the Early Twentieth Century: Sudzilovsky, China, and Japan by Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja)
  • Imagining Urban Community: Contested Geographies and Parallax Urban Dreams on Cheju Island, South Korea by Tommy Tran

Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 5, no. 1 (2016)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 4, no. 2 (2015)

Cross-Currents (4#2) is now available on Project Muse.

Governing Marriage Migrations: Perspectives from Mainland China and Taiwan

Introduction
Elena Barabantseva, Antonia Chao, and Biao Xiang, 405

Cross-border migration for the purpose of marriage is on the rise, and at present it constitutes one of the most common forms of long-term international mobility in East Asia. This special issue of Cross-Currents analyzes marriage migration in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Taiwan as a subject of governance. The articles included here demonstrate that marriage migration has attracted considerable policy attention and public anxiety not because it is about “marriage” or “migration” per se, but because it is perceived to be inseparable from a wide range of other issues, such as sexual morality, family norms, national identity, and border security. In particular, the long-lasting social relationships marriage migration creates and the role of marriage migrants (the vast majority of whom are women) in rearing the next generation of the state’s sovereign subjects tie marriage migration to state security concerns. Popular anxieties about marriage migration are often based on projections into the future rather than observations about the present reality. On one hand, the fact that marriage migration is deeply embedded in myriad social institutions and relations that cannot be dealt with in isolation causes a projection-based mode of governance; on the other hand, it renders transnational marriage particularly hard to govern, which further exacerbates anxiety. But this should not be seen as a failure in public policy. The articles in this special issue argue that such projections, imaginations, and self-perpetuating anxieties are important parts of how nationhood is constructed in the current era. As such, marriage migration as a subject of governance provides us with a special angle to examine how politics works in subtle and sometimes invisible ways on local, national, and transnational levels.

Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 4, no. 2 (2015)”