Pacific Science-Call for Submissions

Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region is edited by Curtis Daehler, Dept. of Botany, University of Hawai‘i.

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. The official journal of the Pacific Science Association.

Issues are published quarterly and available online in BioOne and Project MUSE.

Most Read Articles in BioOne

Epibator insularis, a New Species of Scincid Lizard from l’Île Walpole, New Caledonia
by Ross A. Sadlier, et al. (2019)

Kuniesaurus albiauris, a New Genus and Species of Scincid Lizard from the Île des Pins, New Caledonia, with Comments on the Diversity and Affinities of the Region’s Lizard Fauna
by Ross A. Sadlier, et al. (2019)

Consistent Frequency of Color Morphs in the Sea Star Pisaster ochraceus (Echinodermata:Asteriidae) across Open-Coast Habitats in the Northeastern Pacific1
by Peter T. Raimondi, et al. (2007)

Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 7. The Domestic Cat (Felis catus)1
by David Cameron Duffy, et al. (2012)

Demography of Marine Turtles in the Nearshore Environments of the Northern Mariana Islands1
by Tammy Mae Summers, et al. (2017)

Call for Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. Manuscripts should be addressed to the editor-in-chief, Curtis C. Daehler (daehler@hawaii.edu). For more information on author guidelines please visit the journal homepage.

 

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy

New 2018 content published in our religion and philosophy journals garnered nearly 10,000 downloads worldwide on Project MUSE. Check out the top 10 downloads from quarterly Philosophy East and West, as well as popular articles from related titles. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy”

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies

Top downloads of new 2018 content in our Asian Studies journals include articles and reviews from quarterly China Review International and annual Korean Studies, which also publishes early release articles throughout the year. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies”

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Hawai‘i and the Pacific

New 2018 content published in our Hawai‘i and Pacific journals garnered nearly 7,500 downloads worldwide on both Project MUSE and the University of Hawai‘i’s open access digital repository, Kahualike.

The Contemporary Pacific review of Disney film Moana tops the list, and an article from our new open access Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal features in the top 10. Open access Hawaiian language journal Palapala did not publish new content in 2018 but garnered nearly 2,700 downloads on ScholarSpace. Our new title Rapa Nui Journal began publishing early release articles on Project MUSE in late 2018. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Hawai‘i and the Pacific”

Top Downloaded Articles of 2018

As we head into the new year, we look back on the journal issues published in 2018. Today we’re sharing the 10 most frequently downloaded articles on Project MUSE. Check them out at the links below and sign up for email alerts for new issues in the new year.

The British Empire and the Suppression of the Slave Trade to Brazil: A Global History Analysis by Tâmis Parron

Beyond Paradise? Retelling Pacific Stories in Disney’s Moana by A Mārata Ketekiri Tamaira and Dionne Fonoti

No-Self in Sāṃkhya: A Comparative Look at Classical Sāṃkhya and Theravāda Buddhism by Douglas Osto Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles of 2018”

Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)

Figure 4 from the article “Taiwan’s Dacini Fruit Flies: Rare Endemics and Abundant Pests, along Altitudinal Gradients” by Camiel Doorenwerd, Luc Leblanc, Yu-Feng Hsu, Chia-Lung Huang, Yu-Chi Lin, Michael San Jose, and Daniel Rubinoff. Bactrocera dorsaloides, voucher number ms4389, first recorded for Taiwan. (A) dorsal view, (B) head, frontal view, (C) abdomen detail photo, dorsal view, (D) lateral view, (E) detail photo of the wing.

The first issue in volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Talāsiga Lands in Fiji: Their Potential Expansion through Modern Farming Activities” by R.J. Morrison, and eight more research articles.

Preview volume 73 number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)”

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)

The December issue of Oceanic Linguistics marks the end of an era. Retiring editor John Lynch, managing editor Byron Bender, and review editor Robert Blust will join the editorial advisory board as a new, international team takes over the helm.

In the final pages of this issue, Lynch writes, “On behalf of the outgoing team, I would like to thank authors for the constant flow of submissions, and for their generous acceptance of decisions that are not always in their favor; and I would like to wish the incoming team all the best for the future of Oceanic Linguistics.” Learn more about the new Oceanic Linguistics team here.

In this issue, Robert Blust remembers Richard Bernard McGinn Jr. (1939-2018), a “scholar who had a lifetime commitment to the Austronesian languages of insular Southeast Asia, a talented fieldworker, a lively and enthusiastic teacher, a skilled administrator and facilitator, a friend and colleague with an irrepressible sense of humor, and a committed social activist in his retirement years.” Continue reading “Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)

 Na Hyesŏk's Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.
Figure 1 from “Anarchism and Culture in Colonial Korea” by Sunyoung Park this issue. Na Hyesŏk’s Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes a special section, “Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia,” guest edited by Steven S. Lee. In his introduction, Lee writes that these articles build on existing scholarship by

“…revisiting Russian and Soviet visions of revolution and their fraught, indelible imprint on China, Japan, and Korea. The Soviet Union of the interwar years was distinct from European powers in its mobilization against Western empire and capitalism. Indeed, Russia itself had long been regarded in the West as semi-Asiatic, whereas its stunning defeat in the Russo-Japanese War had blurred long-standing racial and cultural hierarchies. Soviet-Asian encounters might therefore best be understood as intra-Asian—Russia as an ‘Oriental occident’ that, after 1917, beckoned progressive Asians with calls for socialist internationalism and national self-determination. These encounters contributed to the establishment of communist regimes in China and North Korea but also reveal internationalist paths not taken: ways of thinking across national boundaries even while pursuing national struggles against empire. Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)”

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)

Volume 23 Number 4 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and 22 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEWS

Principles and Practices of Chinese Governance a Millennium Ago (reviewing Patricia Buckley and Paul J. Smith, eds. State Power in China, 900-1325) Reviewed by R. Bin Wong

Mao’s, China’s, or Confucius’s Tianxia? Reflections on Chinese Visions of World Order (reviewing Ban Wang, editor. Chinese Visions of World Order—Tianxia, Culture, and World Politics) Reviewed by Bai Tongdong Continue reading “China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)”

Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)

Figure 2 from Kenneth Chan’s essay “Bad Gal” And The “Bad” Refugee: Refugee Narratives, Neoliberal Violence, and Musical Autobiography in Honey Cocaine’s Cambodian Canadian Hip-Hop: The “Orientalist” scene in Honey Cocaine’s “Bad Gal.” Reprinted by permission of Honey Cocaine Music.

From Biography Coeditor John David Zuern’s Editor’s Note:

The format of this issue represents something of a departure for Biography. For many years we have published what we call “clusters” of essays focused on a particular theme alongside our individual open-forum articles. While our editorial staff typically determines the topics and invites the guest editors for our annual special issues, the cluster model gives us the opportunity to consider unsolicited proposals from colleagues who would like to present an edited collection of related essays to Biography’s readership. In the past two years, we have received a number of compelling pitches, and for the first time we are running two clusters in the same issue. These projects have emerged within different geopolitical and cultural contexts, but both address the question of how life stories are crafted and disseminated in media other than print. Continue reading “Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)”

AWP 2019: Join Manoa and The Contemporary Pacific for Translation Panel

The Contemporary Pacific and Manoa at AWP 2019Two journals celebrate their 30th anniversary this yearMĀNOA and The Contemporary Pacific—and join together for two great events at the 2019 Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) Conference in Portland, OR.

The conference brings together more than 12,000 attendees over four days. Mark March 29, 2019 on your calendars to catch these panel discussions.  Continue reading “AWP 2019: Join Manoa and The Contemporary Pacific for Translation Panel”

Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its third special publication. “Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austro-Asiatic Linguistics” is a collection of nine papers.

The conference, held every two years, took place in Kiel, Germany in Fall 2017. This is the fourth published conference proceedings since the conference’s inception at the University of Hawai‘i in 1973. The first was an Oceanic Linguistics special issue in 1976, followed by publications in 2011 and 2014.

“With this special issue we return full circle to publication under the University of Hawai’i Press, and are extremely excited to be part of a new wave of Austroasiatic [AA] studies,” writes editors Hiram Ring and Felix Rau. “There is much work yet to be done on these languages with all their diversity and complexity, but given the multiple perspectives and insights represented by the authors in this volume, and the increasing focus by AA researchers on making underlying data accessible, the outlook for AA studies in the coming century is incredibly positive.” Continue reading “Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS”