Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 9#2, 2018

This issue of the Journal of Korean Religions is on Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts with guest editor, Philip J. Ivanhoe. From the editor’s introduction:

Clifford Geertz writes, ”We are, in sum, incomplete or unfinished animals who complete ourselves through culture—and not through culture in general but through highly particular forms of it.”1 At least part of his point is that unlike other animals, many of whom—like bees, ducks, or dolphins—live in complex and orderly societies, human beings are creatures that come into the world with only a partially written script, unsure of exactly what characters they are to play, what roles they should fulfill, and how they and their actions contribute to some larger scheme or plan. Like culture, religion attempts to fill in the script by providing accounts of human nature, the proper roles humans should play, and how human actions contribute to some grand vision or cosmic plan. Nevertheless, as Geertz makes clear, we can only understand how religion does what it does by looking carefully at particular religions. This special issue of the Journal of Korean Religions seeks to do just that by being dedicated to ”Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts.” The five essays it contains explore a set of interrelated issues about how Confucians, among them Koreans, fill in the script of human life aiming to orient and guide human beings to satisfying and meaningful lives. These essays describe key components of a distinctively Confucian form of spirituality by analyzing characteristically Confucian concerns with cultivating the self in ways that complete human nature, enable one to fulfill one’s proper roles within family and society, take one’s correct place in the world, and realize the Heavenly ordained purpose of one’s life.

Selfishness and Self-centeredness
Philip J. Ivanhoe

Confucian Spirituality: Desire, Self-cultivation, and Religiosity
Vincent Shen

Spirituality, Spontaneity, and Moral Charisma in Korean Confucianism
Young-chan Ro

Individuality and Immortality in Confucian Spirituality
So-Yi Chung

Confucian Spirituality of the Movement of the Heart
Hee-Kyu Heidi Park

The Trouble with Christian Publishing: Yun Ch’iho (1865–1945) and the Complexities of Cultural Nationalism in Colonial Korea
Michael Kim

Catholics and Anti-Catholicism in Chosŏn Korea by Don Baker with Franklin Rausch (review)
Deberniere Torrey

About the Journal

The Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. It aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Journal of Korean Religions Volume 9, Issue 2

U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, Vol. 53, 2018

This issue includes the following scholarly articles.

Facing Modernity: Japanese Women and Hygienic Facial Culture (Biganjutsu) in the Early Twentieth Century
JENNIFER EVANS

“Uncovering the Waste of the World”: Women and the State in Japanese Wartime Waste Campaigns, 1937-1945
REBECCA TOMPKINS

The Contradictions of the Womenomics Campaign: Abe Shinzō’s Employment Reforms and Japan’s Public Service Workers
CHARLES WEATHERS

X-Rated and Excessively Long: Ji-Amari in Hayashi Amari’s Tanka
JON HOLT

Stories by Fujino Kaori: Fear in the Form
KENDALL HEITZMAN

“Today’s Modern Spirits”
FUJINO KAORI

“Identity,”
FUJINO KAORI Continue reading “U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, Vol. 53, 2018”

Language Documentation & Conservation: Special Issue and New Articles (Volume 12)

New uploads have been added to the National Foreign Language Resource Center’s free and open-access journal Language Documentation & Conservation.

A Descriptive Grammar of Shilluk By Bert Remijsen & Otto Gwado Ayoker Continue reading “Language Documentation & Conservation: Special Issue and New Articles (Volume 12)”

Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 52 (2018)

Figure 1 (from the article “Kalākaua and the British Press: The King’s Visit to Europe, 1881”): Kalākaua in uniform wearing the collar, star, badge, and sash of the Order of St. Michael and St. George awarded to him by Queen Victoria during the king’s world tour in 1881. No Date. Courtesy of Bishop Museum.

From page 40 of the article:

The [Whitehall Review] reporter concluded from his interview with the king that Hawaiʻi under Kalākaua was an extremely highly developed country. Indeed, the writer observed, “I parted from his Majesty with regret, envying his subjects” and “hoping that the king would move to England.” Continue reading “Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 52 (2018)”

Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38

Figure 2. Bhavacakra, painting on cloth; Nepal, nineteenth to twentieth century. From Massimiliano Alessandro Polichetti’s article The Sorrowful Fates of Rebirth: Ippolito Desideri Encounters Tibetan Sacred Art.

“[T]he bhavacakra (a kind of mental map of the concepts placed at the basis of Buddhist psycho-cosmology, made graphic with small images set in place in a circular manner that represents the “wheel of rebirths”) is set against the “world of becoming,” samsāra devoured by forgetfulness, represented by Yama, the god of the dead in Buddhist cosmology, who holds all within his jowls as a sign of immanent sorrow.”

 

From the Editors’ Introduction:

October 14–15, 2017, the city of Pistoia in Tuscany hosted an international symposium to honor the legacy of Fr. Ippolito Desideri (1684–1733), the first Jesuit missionary to Tibet who engaged in sustained interreligious dialogue with local Buddhists and whose extraordinary command of the local language even enabled him to author Christian theological treatises in Classical Tibetan.

Continue reading “Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38”

Early Release Articles: Rapa Nui Journal (October 2018)

Earlier this year, UH Press renewed the publication of the Rapa Nui Journal in a new partnership with the Easter Island Foundation. Two early release articles for Vol. 31, No. 1, are now available on the Project MUSE platform.

RAPA NUI JOURNFig. 2. Soft, siliceous woody plant
Figure 2 from “Revisiting Rapa Nui Mata‘a” an early release article now available on Project MUSE.

“Comparisons of Moriori, Maori, and Easter Island Cognates” by Rhys Richards

All the surviving 1,200 words from the extinct Moriori language were compared with Maori and Easter Island languages. A Moriori speaker would have understood much said by an Easter Islander as their languages shared at least one word in five, or over 20%, and probably shared many more.

“Revisiting Rapa Nui Mata‘a” by Robin Torrence, Nina Kononenko, Peter White

Based on a use-wear and residue analysis of a collection of 12 mata‘a in the Australian Museum, Sydney, we question the value of relying on tool shape as an adequate indication of past use. Although the tools in this collection were used for a broad range of tasks, including plant processing, wood, shell and bone working, and cutting and piercing of flesh or skin, some may have been used in interpersonal conflict. The study illustrates the value of museum ethnographic collections for understanding past tool use. Continue reading “Early Release Articles: Rapa Nui Journal (October 2018)”

Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its second special publication. “Papers from the Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium on Southeast Asian Linguistics” is a collection of 19 papers.

The symposium organizers and volume editors invited authors to submit their manuscripts, which were then assessed by two anonymous reviewers to ensure high quality. Editors Pittayawat Pittayaporn, Sujinat Jitwiriyanont, Pavadee Saisuwan, and Bhimbasistha Tejarajanya say that all these student papers are “outstanding and reflects the authors’ high potential to become great linguists. Importantly, the number of promising young scholars that contributed to this volume suggests a very bright future for Southeast Asian linguistics as a field.” Continue reading “Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)”

Call for Papers: Global Automobilization, Journal of World History

This Special Issue of the Journal of World History invites article manuscripts that address any aspect related to the global, transnational, and cross-cultural histories of automobilization, automobilism, anti-automobilism, de-pedestrianization, and re-pedestrianization. Continue reading “Call for Papers: Global Automobilization, Journal of World History”

Words from the Fire: Poems by Jidi Majia (MĀNOA 30:1)

Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo. Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo.
This Nuosu ritual painting is of the magical python Bbahxa Ayuosse or Bbahxa Arrysse, one of the supernatural helpers of the Nuosu hero Zhyge Alu. Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo. Object #1998–83/102—Scroll, Painting. Gift of the Blakemore Foundation, courtesy of Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington.

The new issue of MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, volume 30 number 1, is a collection of poems by Jidi Majia, translated by Jami Proctor Xu.

Jidi Majia is a member of the Yi ethnic minority group, one of the fifty-five officially recognized minorities in China and the sixth largest, comprising about nine million people. The subgroup to which Jidi Majia belongs, Nuosu, is the largest. For centuries Nuosu people have held on to their language, culture, and social structure, staving off assimilation by the majority Han.

This collection of more than 125 of Jidi Majia’s poems opens with an editor’s note and concludes with a translation of Jidi Majia’s speech for the 2017 Xu Zhimo Poetry and Art Festival at Cambridge University. More than a dozen images featuring Nuosu scrolls and paintings accompany the poems. Continue reading “Words from the Fire: Poems by Jidi Majia (MĀNOA 30:1)”

Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (October 2018)

University of Hawaiʻi Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles and book reviews from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

Review of Ross King’s Seoul: Memory, Reinvention, and the Korean Wave. University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2018.
by Keith Howard

Review of The Korean Wave: Evolution, Fandom, and Transnationality, edited by Tae-Jin Yoon and Dal Long Jin. Lexington Books, 2017.
by Roald Maliangkay

Review of Dafna Zur’s Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea. Stanford University Press, 2017
by Sonya F. Zabala

Review of Kōji Takazawa’s Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles. University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2017.
by John Cussen

The Punishments of the 1728 Musin Rebellion Leaders (article)
by Andrew David Jackson

Muhammad Kkansu and the Diasporic Other in the Two Koreas (article)
by Theodore Jun Yoo

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.

Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)

From the article “New Distribution Records of Cetaceans from the Federated States of Micronesia,” by Donald W. Buden and Allain Bourgoin. Cetaceans recorded on Pohnpei for the first time: Kogia sp., A, whole body, ventral view; B, undersurface of head showing teeth and jaws. Globicephala macrorhynchusC, whole body; D, oblique view of head showing teeth and jaws.

The fourth issue in volume 72 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Nocturnal Visual Census of Pelagic Fauna Using Scuba near Kona, Hawaiʻi”, eight more research articles, plus an index to all of volume 72. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)”

Asian Perspectives, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)

From Asian Perspectives 57-2: The first Peking Man tooth, PMU M3550 (left) and original label (right), assigning the tooth to a new genus and species: Sinanthropus pekinensis Black.
From this issue, “The Dates of the Discovery of the First Peking Man Fossil Teeth” by Qian Wang, Li Sun, and Jan Ove R. Ebbestad. The first Peking Man tooth, PMU M3550 (left) and original label (right), assigning the tooth to a new genus and species: Sinanthropus pekinensis Black.

This issue of Asian Perspectives features the following scholarly articles:

Late Middle Palaeolithic Subsistence in the Central Plain of China: A Zooarchaeological View from the Laonainaimiao Site, Henan Province
Qu Tongli, Chen Youcheng, Ofer Bar-Yosef, and Wang Youping

New Data from an Open Neolithic Site in Eastern Indonesia
Peter Lape, Emily Peterson, Daud Tanudirjo, Chung-Ching Shiung, Gyoung-Ah Lee, Judith Field, and Adelle Coster

Preliminary Results of the South Vanuatu Archaeological Survey: Cultural Landscapes, Excavation, and Radiocarbon Dating
James L. Flexner, Stuart Bedford, Frédérique Valentin, Richard Shing, Takaronga Kuautonga, and Wanda Zinger

The Dates of the Discovery of the First Peking Man Fossil Teeth
Qian Wang, Li Sun, and Jan Ove R. Ebbestad

The Guandimiao Bone Assemblage (and What it Says about the Shang Economy)
Hou Yanfeng, Roderick Campbell, Li Zhipeng, Zhang Yan, Li Suting, and He Yuling

Continue reading “Asian Perspectives, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)”