Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy

New 2018 content published in our religion and philosophy journals garnered nearly 10,000 downloads worldwide on Project MUSE. Check out the top 10 downloads from quarterly Philosophy East and West, as well as popular articles from related titles. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy”

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies

Top downloads of new 2018 content in our Asian Studies journals include articles and reviews from quarterly China Review International and annual Korean Studies, which also publishes early release articles throughout the year. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies”

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Hawai‘i and the Pacific

New 2018 content published in our Hawai‘i and Pacific journals garnered nearly 7,500 downloads worldwide on both Project MUSE and the University of Hawai‘i’s open access digital repository, Kahualike.

The Contemporary Pacific review of Disney film Moana tops the list, and an article from our new open access Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal features in the top 10. Open access Hawaiian language journal Palapala did not publish new content in 2018 but garnered nearly 2,700 downloads on ScholarSpace. Our new title Rapa Nui Journal began publishing early release articles on Project MUSE in late 2018. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Hawai‘i and the Pacific”

Top Downloaded Articles of 2018

As we head into the new year, we look back on the journal issues published in 2018. Today we’re sharing the 10 most frequently downloaded articles on Project MUSE. Check them out at the links below and sign up for email alerts for new issues in the new year.

The British Empire and the Suppression of the Slave Trade to Brazil: A Global History Analysis by Tâmis Parron

Beyond Paradise? Retelling Pacific Stories in Disney’s Moana by A Mārata Ketekiri Tamaira and Dionne Fonoti

No-Self in Sāṃkhya: A Comparative Look at Classical Sāṃkhya and Theravāda Buddhism by Douglas Osto Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles of 2018”

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)

The December issue of Oceanic Linguistics marks the end of an era. Retiring editor John Lynch, managing editor Byron Bender, and review editor Robert Blust will join the editorial advisory board as a new, international team takes over the helm.

In the final pages of this issue, Lynch writes, “On behalf of the outgoing team, I would like to thank authors for the constant flow of submissions, and for their generous acceptance of decisions that are not always in their favor; and I would like to wish the incoming team all the best for the future of Oceanic Linguistics.” Learn more about the new Oceanic Linguistics team here.

In this issue, Robert Blust remembers Richard Bernard McGinn Jr. (1939-2018), a “scholar who had a lifetime commitment to the Austronesian languages of insular Southeast Asia, a talented fieldworker, a lively and enthusiastic teacher, a skilled administrator and facilitator, a friend and colleague with an irrepressible sense of humor, and a committed social activist in his retirement years.” Continue reading “Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)

 Na Hyesŏk's Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.
Figure 1 from “Anarchism and Culture in Colonial Korea” by Sunyoung Park this issue. Na Hyesŏk’s Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes a special section, “Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia,” guest edited by Steven S. Lee. In his introduction, Lee writes that these articles build on existing scholarship by

“…revisiting Russian and Soviet visions of revolution and their fraught, indelible imprint on China, Japan, and Korea. The Soviet Union of the interwar years was distinct from European powers in its mobilization against Western empire and capitalism. Indeed, Russia itself had long been regarded in the West as semi-Asiatic, whereas its stunning defeat in the Russo-Japanese War had blurred long-standing racial and cultural hierarchies. Soviet-Asian encounters might therefore best be understood as intra-Asian—Russia as an ‘Oriental occident’ that, after 1917, beckoned progressive Asians with calls for socialist internationalism and national self-determination. These encounters contributed to the establishment of communist regimes in China and North Korea but also reveal internationalist paths not taken: ways of thinking across national boundaries even while pursuing national struggles against empire. Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)”

AWP 2019: Join Manoa and The Contemporary Pacific for Translation Panel

The Contemporary Pacific and Manoa at AWP 2019Two journals celebrate their 30th anniversary this yearMĀNOA and The Contemporary Pacific—and join together for two great events at the 2019 Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) Conference in Portland, OR.

The conference brings together more than 12,000 attendees over four days. Mark March 29, 2019 on your calendars to catch these panel discussions.  Continue reading “AWP 2019: Join Manoa and The Contemporary Pacific for Translation Panel”

Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its third special publication. “Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austro-Asiatic Linguistics” is a collection of nine papers.

The conference, held every two years, took place in Kiel, Germany in Fall 2017. This is the fourth published conference proceedings since the conference’s inception at the University of Hawai‘i in 1973. The first was an Oceanic Linguistics special issue in 1976, followed by publications in 2011 and 2014.

“With this special issue we return full circle to publication under the University of Hawai’i Press, and are extremely excited to be part of a new wave of Austroasiatic [AA] studies,” writes editors Hiram Ring and Felix Rau. “There is much work yet to be done on these languages with all their diversity and complexity, but given the multiple perspectives and insights represented by the authors in this volume, and the increasing focus by AA researchers on making underlying data accessible, the outlook for AA studies in the coming century is incredibly positive.” Continue reading “Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS”

Support MĀNOA’s Upcoming Title, Becoming Brazil

The team at MĀNOA has just launched two ways to support the longstanding journal of international writing. Supporters can back the upcoming issue, Becoming Brazil, through Kickstarter and also pledge support for the journal overall through Patreon.

Support Becoming Brazil on Kickstarter

Becoming Brazil Manoa 30-2 Front CoverBecoming Brazil: New Fiction, Poetry, and Memoir is the forthcoming title from MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing. The issue includes more than two dozen works by canonical twentieth-century Brazilian writers, innovative contemporary authors, and new voices, many of them in translation for the first time.

Authors include Conceição Evaristo, Marcílio França Castro, Milton Hatoum, José Luiz Passos, and João Guimarães Rosa. Becoming Brazil also features images by celebrated photographers Sebastião Salgado and Marcio Rodrigues. Guest-edited by Eric M. B. Becker (founder of Words without Borders) and MĀNOA contributing editor Noah Perales-Estoesta, Becoming Brazil will appear in a handsome print edition from the University of Hawai‘i Press, a digital edition through Project MUSE; and an ebook through Amazon.com.

Learn how to support Becoming Brazil on Kickstarter.

Support MĀNOA through Patreon Continue reading “Support MĀNOA’s Upcoming Title, Becoming Brazil”

Language Documentation & Conservation: Special Issue and New Articles (Volume 12)

New uploads have been added to the National Foreign Language Resource Center’s free and open-access journal Language Documentation & Conservation.

A Descriptive Grammar of Shilluk By Bert Remijsen & Otto Gwado Ayoker Continue reading “Language Documentation & Conservation: Special Issue and New Articles (Volume 12)”

Early Release Articles: Rapa Nui Journal (October 2018)

Earlier this year, UH Press renewed the publication of the Rapa Nui Journal in a new partnership with the Easter Island Foundation. Two early release articles for Vol. 31, No. 1, are now available on the Project MUSE platform.

RAPA NUI JOURNFig. 2. Soft, siliceous woody plant
Figure 2 from “Revisiting Rapa Nui Mata‘a” an early release article now available on Project MUSE.

“Comparisons of Moriori, Maori, and Easter Island Cognates” by Rhys Richards

All the surviving 1,200 words from the extinct Moriori language were compared with Maori and Easter Island languages. A Moriori speaker would have understood much said by an Easter Islander as their languages shared at least one word in five, or over 20%, and probably shared many more.

“Revisiting Rapa Nui Mata‘a” by Robin Torrence, Nina Kononenko, Peter White

Based on a use-wear and residue analysis of a collection of 12 mata‘a in the Australian Museum, Sydney, we question the value of relying on tool shape as an adequate indication of past use. Although the tools in this collection were used for a broad range of tasks, including plant processing, wood, shell and bone working, and cutting and piercing of flesh or skin, some may have been used in interpersonal conflict. The study illustrates the value of museum ethnographic collections for understanding past tool use. Continue reading “Early Release Articles: Rapa Nui Journal (October 2018)”

Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its second special publication. “Papers from the Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium on Southeast Asian Linguistics” is a collection of 19 papers.

The symposium organizers and volume editors invited authors to submit their manuscripts, which were then assessed by two anonymous reviewers to ensure high quality. Editors Pittayawat Pittayaporn, Sujinat Jitwiriyanont, Pavadee Saisuwan, and Bhimbasistha Tejarajanya say that all these student papers are “outstanding and reflects the authors’ high potential to become great linguists. Importantly, the number of promising young scholars that contributed to this volume suggests a very bright future for Southeast Asian linguistics as a field.” Continue reading “Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)”