Adapted for the Screen: The Cultural Politics of Modern Chinese Fiction and Film
Quantity:
ADD TO CART
256pp. May 2010
Adapted for the Screen: The Cultural Politics of Modern Chinese Fiction and Film
Author: Deppman, Hsiu-Chuang;
Contemporary Chinese films are popular with audiences worldwide, but a key reason for their success has gone unnoticed: many of the films are adapted from brilliant literary works. This book is the first to put these landmark films in the context of their literary origins and explore how the best Chinese directors adapt fictional narratives and styles for film.

Hsiu-Chuang Deppman unites aesthetics with history in her argument that the rise of cinema in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan in the late 1980s was partly fueled by burgeoning literary movements. Fifth Generation director Zhang Yimou’s highly acclaimed films Red Sorghum, Raise the Red Lantern, and To Live are built on the experimental works of Mo Yan, Su Tong, and Yu Hua, respectively. Hong Kong new wave’s Ann Hui and Stanley Kwan capitalized on the irresistible visual metaphors of Eileen Chang’s postrealism. Hou Xiaoxian’s new Taiwan cinema turned to fiction by Huang Chunming and Zhu Tianwen for fine-grained perspectives on class and gender relations. Delving equally into the individual approaches of directors and writers, Deppman initiates readers into the exciting possibilities emanating from the world of Chinese cinema. The seven in-depth studies include a diverse array of forms (cinematic adaptation of literature, literary adaptation of film, auto-adaptation, and non-narrative adaptation) and a variety of genres (martial arts, melodrama, romance, autobiography, documentary drama). Complementing this formal diversity is a geographical range that far exceeds the cultural, linguistic, and physical boundaries of China. The directors represented here also work in the U.S. and Europe and reflect the growing international resources of Chinese-language cinema.

With her sophisticated blend of stylistic and historical analyses, Deppman brings much-needed nuance to current conversations about the politics of gender, class, and race in the work of the most celebrated Chinese writers and directors. Her pioneering study will appeal to all readers, general and academic, who have an interest in Chinese literature, cinema, and culture.

112 illus.

“An innovative and engaging work that offers nuanced and insightful readings of cinematic adaptations of literature, nonnarative adaptation, auto-adaptation, and literary adaptation of film. Deppman’s analyses are sophisticated and rich in literary and film theory, yet remain approachable to readers of various levels, thanks to her clear writing style and effective utilization of examples. The book is of great research and pedagogical value and is highly recommended to researchers, teachers, and graduate and college students interested in cinema and literature.” —China Review International (17:3, 2010)

“With her sophisticated blend of stylistic and historical analyses, Deppman brings much-needed nuance to current conversations about the politics of gender, class, and race in the work of the most celebrated Chinese writers and directors. Her pioneering study will appeal to all readers, general and academic, who have an interest in Chinese literature, cinema, and culture.” —China Books (July 2012)

“[Contains] detailed, thoughtful, and yet accessible comparative analyses. The author’s description of the interactions between the chosen films and their original texts shows fine scholarly learning, impressive critical skill as well as a rare literary sensitivity to textual detail.” —Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews (33, 2011)

“This eye-opening and engaging work—enhanced by numerous film-still reproductions and neatly synoptic endnotes on literary and film history—provides an excellent introduction and critical gateway to late-20th-century China-related cinema. . . . Highly recommended.” —Choice

"Hsiu-Chuang Deppman’s ambitious book investigates the complex associative and conceptual interaction between literature and film, arguing that in many cases, a structural connection underlies the relationship. Her work is a strong challenge to those who believe literature and film should always be regarded as completely separate and unrelated. Deppman’s fascinating chapter on the hip Wong Kar-wai and his debt to novelist Liu Yichang well illustrates the way in which directors can play with and play off of narrative structures, in the process setting up a provocative intersection." –Wendy Larson, University of Oregon

"This excellent book is nuanced in its readings, sophisticated in itsemployment of literary and film theory, and clearly and elegantlywritten. The author is at ease not only in her analysis of a short story or novel but with formal and poststructural film analysis as well. The book is sure to set the standard for a generation of scholars interested in the question of how fiction and visual culture interact and overlap." —Christopher Lupke, Washington State University

Author: Deppman, Hsiu-Chuang;
Hsiu-Chuang Deppman is associate professor of Chinese at Oberlin College.
Read the introduction (PDF).
Acknowledgments 
 
Introduction 

1. Wang Dulu and Ang Lee:Artistic Creativity and Sexual Freedom in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon <p>
2. Su Tong and Zhang Yimou:Women’s Places in Raise the Red Lantern 
3. Eileen Chang and Stanley Kwan: Politics and Love in Red Rose (and) White Rose 
4. Liu Yichang and Wong Kar-wai:The Class Trap in In the Mood for Love 
5. Dai Sijie: Locating the Third Culture in Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress 
6. Hou Xiaoxian and Zhu Tianwen: Politics and Poetics in A Time to Live, A Time to Die 
7. Chen Yuhui and Chen Guofu: Envisioning Democracy in The Personals <p>

Conclusion 
Notes 
Bibliography 
Selected Filmography 
Index



THIS SITE MAY BE RUNNING UNLICENSED ASPDOTNETSTOREFRONT.COM SOFTWARE!
CLICK HERE TO ACTIVATE YOUR LICENSE