My Gun, My Brother: The World of the Papua New Guinea Colonial Police, 1920-1960
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440pp. May 1998
My Gun, My Brother: The World of the Papua New Guinea Colonial Police, 1920-1960
Author: Kituai, August Ibrum K.;
Despite the heated competition for colonial possessions in Papua New Guinea during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the personnel required to run an effective administration were scarce. As a result, the Australian colonial regime opted for a quick solution: it engaged Papua New Guineans—often to perform the most hazardous and most unpopular responsibilities. Based on extensive interviews with former policemen, written records of the time, and reminiscences of colonial officials, this book links events involving police, villagers, and government officers (kiaps) over a forty-year period to wider issues in the colonial history of Papua New Guinea and, by extension, of the Pacific Islands and beyond.
Pacific Islands Monograph Series, No. 15
Published in association with the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, University of Hawai‘i
"This is a big, dense book, one of the most impressive pieces of historical scholarship to come out of Papua New Guinea.... Kituai does not flinch from telling tales of hypocrisy by black and white bearers of colonial peace, indeed of cases of sadism by both police and their district officers, which crushed the confidence of some communities.... [T]he end result is a ‘thickish’ description of a colonial culture throughout Papua New Guinea under Australian rule, in which the singular stories of individual police who were the sharp end of that rule give weight and texture to an analysis of the system that will stand its ground for historians of colonialism." —The Contemporary Pacific, Spring 2000 (Download full review)
Author: Kituai, August Ibrum K.;



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